Sir William Dunn School of Pathology: Oral Histories

Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

Charlotte McKillop-Mash
2018


Wellcome Trust

Department of Special Collections
Contact Information
Search Online Catalogues

Consulting material: To consult archives and manuscripts, a full and unrestricted Bodleian reader's card (Group A) is required. You should apply for your card at the Admissions Office.

Pre-ordering: Before your visit you may order up to ten items by emailing specialcollections.bookings@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Please be advised that some collection material is held offsite; we advise pre-ordering at least two working days before your visit to ensure material is available on your arrival.


Sir William Dunn School of Pathology: Oral Histories

2018

Abstract:
Oral history interviews conducted with 21 scientists, administrators and technicians associated with the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology at the University of Oxford.

Extent: 21 items, 21 digital shelfmarks
Language(s) of Material: English

Full range of shelfmarks:

MSS. 12467 digital 1-21

Biographical History

In 2017, as part of the '75 Years of Penicillin in People' project funded by the Wellcome Trust, the Bodleian Library commissioned a series of oral history interviews with scientists, administrators, and technicians who work, or formerly worked, at the University of Oxford’s Sir William Dunn School of Pathology. The interviews were conducted by Georgina Ferry.

Scope and Content

Twenty one audio files, each up to two hours long, with interviews conducted by Georgina Ferry.

Acquisition

The interviews were conducted in 2017 and commissioned by the Bodleian Library as part of the '75 years of Penicillin in People' project, funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Preferred Form of Citation

Oxford, Bodleian Library [followed by shelfmark and folio or page reference, e.g. MS. 12467 digital 1].

Audio recordings can be streamed online via University of Oxford Podcasts.

Corporate name(s) (NCA Rules)

University of Oxford | Sir William Dunn School of Pathology x Dunn School

Subject(s)

20th century
21st century
Medicine -- England -- Oxford -- History
Science -- History -- 20th century
Science -- History -- 21st century

Descriptive List

Neil Barclay
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 1
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Neil Barclay is Emeritus Professor of Chemical Pathology in the Dunn School. He arrived in Oxford as an undergraduate in 1969 to study Biochemistry, and undertook a DPhil in the same department supervised by Alan Williams.

After a post-doctoral position in Sweden, he returned to Oxford to work on monoclonal antibodies with Williams, who had just been appointed head of the MRC Cellular Immunology Unit within the Dunn School. Barclay pioneered the sequencing of proteins on the surface of cells of the immune system that had been isolated through the use of monoclonal antibodies.

In 2010 he succeeded George Brownlee as EP Abraham Professor of Chemical Pathology. He set up the CIU Trust to manage royalties from sales of monoclonal antibodies generated within the Cellular Immunology Unit, and through this has partially endowed the Barclay Williams Chair in Molecular Immunology. He is also Chair of the EPA Cephalosporin Fund, and has founded a company, Everest Biotech, that is based in Nepal and uses goats to generates antibodies against human proteins for research.


Valerie Boasten
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 2
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Valerie Boasten joined the Dunn School in 1983 as the personal assistant to the head of department, Professor Henry Harris, having previously been PA to the Director of Social Services for Oxfordshire County Council. Succeeding the formidable Mrs Finch-Mason, known for rigorously controlling access to the head of department, she adopted an alternative approach of quiet indispensability.

On Harris’s retirement in 1994 she continued as PA to the new head of department, Herman Waldmann. After her retirement from this role she became part-time administrator for the EPA Cephalosporin Fund, the EPA Research Fund and the Guy Newton Research Fund, trusts established by Sir Edward Abraham to receive the royalties on the antibiotic cephalosporin.

Boasten retired from the Funds in 2013. Having a wide interest in University affairs, she was appointed to a ceremonial position as Oxford’s first-ever female Bedel in 1998, and was promoted to Senior Bedel, Bedel of Divinity, in 2003. She retired from this role in September 2015 and was awarded an Honorary MA by the University that year.


Restrictions on Access:

Closed.


Marion Brown
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 3
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Marion H Brown is a Principal Investigator in the Dunn School, working in the area of molecular immunology. At the age of eight she moved from England to Australia, where her father, an astronomer, built a new form of stellar observatory.

Having obtained her first degree in Australia, she took research posts in England and Australia before completing a PhD at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund in London. She then came to the Dunn School on a Beit Fellowship to work in the MRC Cellular Immunology Unit with Alan Williams. With the closure of the Unit after Williams’s death, she continued to work with Neil Barclay and Anton van de Merwe on cell surface proteins that are critical to interactions between cells in the immune system.

Brown has initiated and run an annual Research Techniques Days for graduate students in the Medical Sciences Division, and also organised the annual departmental symposium. She is interested the mutual engagement of science and theatre, and has produced performances of science-based theatre.


Restrictions on Access:

Closed.


George Brownlee
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 4
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

George Brownlee FRS is Emeritus Professor of Chemical Pathology in the Dunn School. He obtained his PhD at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, working with the Nobel prizewinner Fred Sanger on the sequencing of small RNAs. He continued to work at the LMB as an independent scientist, on messenger RNA and the RNA genome of the influenza virus.

In 1978 he was invited by Henry Harris to become the inaugural Professor of Chemical Pathology at the Dunn School, where he introduced molecular biological techniques to the department and developed faster methods of sequencing RNA. He also bought the first computer in the department in order to store and analyse nucleic acid sequences.

Brownlee continued to work on the influenza virus, work that was critical to developing some influenza vaccines, and also cloned human Factor IX, which is deficient in some forms of haemophilia. With the royalties from these discoveries he has partly endowed the Brownlee Abraham Chair of Molecular Biology in the Dunn School, and he is also a past Chair of the EPA Cephalosporin Fund.


Peter Cook
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 5
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Peter Cook has retired from his post as Professor of Cell Biology, but continues to pursue his research half-time in the Dunn School as a departmental lecturer. He read Biochemistry as an undergraduate at Oxford, and moved to the Dunn School in 1967 to pursue research for a DPhil under the supervision of the head of department, Henry Harris. He has remained in the department ever since.

Cook’s research as a graduate student used cell fusion to study how gene expression was controlled. His subsequent research has focused on the structural basis of transcription, looking at the coiling and folding of DNA in chromosomes and the interaction of the genetic material with enzymes.

Working with a colleague in Engineering Science, he has set up a company called iotaSciences to develop an invention that can handle very small volumes of liquids for purposes such as biological experimentation. He is a Trustee of the Guy Newton Research Fund and chairs the CIU Trust set up by Neil Barclay.


Paul Fairchild
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 6
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Paul Fairchild is Associate Professor and Lecturer in Medicine at the Dunn School and was Co-Director of the Oxford Stem Cell Institute from 2008-2015. He first came to Oxford in 1987 to undertake a DPhil in the Nuffield Department of Surgery, working with Jonathan Austyn who had been a student in the Dunn School with Siamon Gordon.

Fairchild worked on the role of dendritic cells in preventing autoimmunity through the induction of tolerance in T cells. He then went to the Department of Pathology at Cambridge for post-doctoral research on how this system fails in multiple sclerosis. There he met Hermann Waldmann: when Waldmann succeeded Henry Harris as head of the Dunn School he invited Fairchild to join his group in Oxford.

Fairchild developed a technique for differentiating embryonic stem cells into dendritic cells. In 2008 he became the founding director of the Oxford Stem Cell Institute, which brings together 50 laboratories in 17 departments across the university, in collaborative projects initially supported by the Oxford Martin School. He has also been editor of the Dunn School magazine, Fusion, for ten years.


Matthew Freeman
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 7
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Matthew Freeman FRS joined the Dunn School as Professor of Pathology and head of department in 2013. He remembers meeting the Nobel-prizewinning immunologist Peter Medawar as a teenager, who told him ‘Chemistry is dead, Physics is dying and Biology is the only science that’s worth pursuing.’

Inspired by this, Freeman read Biochemistry at Oxford before going to Imperial College London to undertake a PhD on the genetic control of the cell cycle in fruit flies, in a department that was one of the first to use recombinant DNA methods to clone genes. This led to a post-doc at the University of California at Berkeley, from which he returned in 1992 to set up his own lab at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, working on receptors that are critical to the development of the Drosophila eye.

He remained at LMB for 21 years, for the last six as head of the Cell Biology Division. Since his move to head the Dunn School he has focused on encouraging collaboration between research groups, under an over-arching definition of pathology as ‘the cell biology that underlies human disease’. He is a trustee of the EP Abraham Research Fund.


Siamon Gordon
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 8
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Siamon Gordon FRS is Professor Emeritus of Cellular Pathology in the Dunn School. He was born the son of Lithuanian Jewish immigrants in an Afrikaans-speaking village in South Africa. Having excelled at school he qualified in medicine at the University of Cape Town before taking post-doctoral research posts in London (at St Mary’s Hospital) and Rockefeller University.

While in New York he heard a lecture by Henry Harris on his then new technique of cell fusion. He joined the laboratory of Zanvil Cohn at Rockefeller and did a PhD, first working with cell fusion and later focusing specifically on macrophages. He admits to being 'slightly obsessed' with macrophages, which he has worked on ever since.

After further post-doctoral work, Gordon successfully applied for a Readership in Cellular Pathology at the Dunn School, arriving in 1976. He remained there for the rest of his career, continuing his work with macrophages. He has encouraged many international young scientists to work in his lab, especially from South Africa. He initiated an AIDS awareness campaign in South Africa, distributing an illustrated book entitled Staying Alive: Fighting HIV/AIDS (later You, Me and HIV). Since retirement he has worked on the history of macrophage biology.


David Greaves
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 9
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

David Greaves is Professor of Inflammation Biology at the Dunn School. He did a first degree in microbiology and biochemistry at the University of Bristol before going to King’s College, London for his PhD. He worked on the expression of the beta globin gene in the same laboratory where Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin had carried out their studies of the structure of DNA.

A first post-doctoral position took him to Amsterdam to work on gene expression in trypanosomes. He returned to the UK to join the National Institute for Medical Research at Mill Hill before briefly working in the laboratories of GD Searle Monsanto. His return to academic research in 1993 came in the form of a post-doctoral position with Siamon Gordon at the Dunn School, using transgenic models to study the role of macrophages in inflammation.

Since 1999 he has continued this work as a group leader, also developing the use of live-cell imaging to study the process of phagocytosis. Since the early 2000s Greaves has been responsible for organising the teaching of pathology and microbiology to up to 150 medical students per year.


Gillian Griffiths
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 10
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Gillian Griffiths FRS is Professor of Immunology and Cell Biology and Director of the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research at the University of Cambridge. While an undergraduate at University College London she was encouraged by immunologists Martin Raff and Avrion Mitchison to apply for a PhD with César Milstein at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

Under Milstein’s guidance she was the first to sequence the complete variable regions of antibodies. She then spent five years as a post-doc at Stanford University in California before moving to the Basel Institute of Immunology in 1990 to work on the cell biology of killer T cells.

In 1995 she won a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellowship and two years later came to the Dunn School to set up her lab. Her work revealed the mechanisms by which killer cells neutralise infected or cancerous cells with exquisite precision. In 2001 she was given the title of Professor, the first woman to hold such a title in the department. She moved to Cambridge for family reasons in 2008.


Keith Gull
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 11
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Keith Gull FRS is the Principal of St Edmund Hall, Oxford, and Professor of Molecular Microbiology. He studied microbiology at Queen Elizabeth College in London and remained there to do a PhD, moving straight into a lectureship at the University of Kent in 1972. There he used electron microscopy to study microtubules, first in fungi and later in disease-causing microbes, the trypanosomes.

Gull moved to the University of Manchester in 1989 as Professor of Biochemistry, and participated in the restructuring of its School of Biological Sciences. Deciding to focus on science rather than administration, he won a Wellcome Trust Principal Fellowship, which enabled him in 2002 to move into the newly-completed EP Abraham Research Building at the Dunn School.

His group explored the proteins that make up the flagella of microbes, conserved in evolution to form the cilia of mammalian cells. He has helped to reorganise graduate education in Medical Sciences at Oxford, and set up collaborations to improve the training of young scientists in Africa. Unusually, since becoming Head of House at St Edmund Hall in 2009 he has continued to lead an active research lab in the Dunn School.


Simon Hunt
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 12
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Simon Hunt was a University Lecturer in the Dunn School from 1974 until he retired in 2012. He came to Oxford to read biochemistry at Trinity College in 1963, and returned to begin a DPhil in that department with Rodney Porter in 1968, after a year’s VSO in Antigua.

His project on cell surface proteins on lymphocytes involved collaboration with Jim Gowans, who headed the Cellular Immunology Unit in the Dunn School, and who effectively became a co-supervisor. Hunt applied methods of separating lymphocytes by size so that he could study different populations of immune cells.

He spent a further two years as a post-doc with Gowans before being appointed to the lecturership, and continued to work on the differentiation of T and B cells, using antibodies as markers. Beside his major research interests he collaborated with Henry Harris, Alan Williams and Norman Heatley, who had been a crucial member of the team that developed penicillin. He was given a Lifetime Achievement in Teaching award by the Medical Sciences Division in 2015.


Restrictions on Access:

Closed.


William James
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 13
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

William James came to the Department of Biochemistry at Oxford as a graduate student, having done a first degree in genetics at Birmingham, and completed a DPhil in microbiology with Joel Mandelstam.

In 1984 he was appointed to a departmental demonstratorship (junior lecturership) in bacteriology in the Dunn School. He has remained in the department ever since, rising to the position of Professor of Virology in 2006. His research focus shifted from bacterial genetics to HIV, and the routes by which the virus evades the defences of the immune cells that it infects. Technologies he has applied in his research include RNA interference and embryonic stem cells, and in 2008 he co-founded the Oxford Stem Cell Institute.

Alongside his research James has played a key role in the administration of the Dunn School, overseeing the finances and taking the lead in three major capital building projects that have transformed the department. From 2008 to 2011 he was Associate Head of Oxford’s Division of Medical Sciences, and from 2011 to 2017 the University’s Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Planning and Resources).


Restrictions on Access:

Closed.


Gordon Macpherson
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 14
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Gordon MacPherson retired as Reader in Experimental Pathology at the Dunn School in 2008, having spent almost his entire scientific career in the department. He first came to Oxford in the early 1960s to read medicine, where he heard lectures by the newly-appointed head of the Dunn School Henry Harris, and learned practical skills from Margaret Jennings (Lady Florey).

He completed his medical training at the London Hospital in Whitechapel, before returning to pursue a DPhil in the Dunn School with John French on blood platelets. At Harris’s suggestion, he then took up a fellowship at the John Curtin Medical School in Canberra to train in immunology, and after his return established a group that was one of the first to characterise dendritic cells, key regulators of the immune response.

He has subsequently led explored a wide range of interactions involving dendritic cells, such as how they transport the prion particles that cause diseases such as scrapie in sheep and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Alongside his research, MacPherson is widely admired for his skills as a teacher and lecturer. He is co-author, with Jon Austyn, of Exploring Immunology: Concepts and Evidence, a concise textbook for undergraduates published in 2012.


Fiona Powrie
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 15
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Fiona Powrie FRS is Director of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology in Oxford. The first in her family to receive a university education, she studied biochemistry at the University of Bath. She thought better of her first choice of accountancy as a career, and came to the MRC Immunology Unit at the Dunn School to undertake a DPhil with Don Mason.

She discovered a regulatory role for T cells in the immune response, and while pursuing this work during her post-doc at the DNAX Research Institute in California, discovered a connection between the immune response and inflammation in the gut. Her research has focused ever since on the role of interactions between gut bacteria and the immune system in inflammatory bowel disease.

She returned to Oxford with a Wellcome Senior Fellowship at the Nuffield Department of Surgery before coming back to the Dunn School as Professor of Immunology in 2001. In 2009 she was appointed to the new Sidney Truelove Chair in Gastroenterology in the Nuffield Department of Medicine, and five years later took up her current position at the Kennedy Institute. She has received many honours for her work, including the 2012 Louis-Jeantet Prize.


Nicholas Proudfoot
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 16
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Nicholas Proudfoot FRS is Brownlee-Abraham Professor of Molecular Biology in the Dunn School. After a first degree in biochemistry at Bedford College in London, through a chance introduction he was taken on as a research student by the Nobel prizewinner Fred Sanger at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

There he worked closely with George Brownlee, developing a new way of sequencing messenger RNA by copying it into complementary DNA molecules. They discovered a key sequence that occurs universally at the tail of messenger RNA molecules to signal that the translated protein sequence should terminate. He went on to work on the purification of globin genes at LMB, and later as a post-doc at Caltech and Harvard.

In 1978 Brownlee was appointed Professor of Chemical Pathology at the Dunn School, and established a unit that would introduce the new molecular biology to the department. Proudfoot successfully applied for a lectureship associated with the unit. Ever since he has worked on the control of transcription, particularly the termination of DNA sequences, and how its failure is implicated in viral infections and cancer.


Restrictions on Access:

Closed.


Elizabeth Robertson
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 17
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Elizabeth Robertson FRS is Professor of Developmental Biology and a Wellcome Trust Principal Fellow at the Dunn School. Having spent her early childhood collecting animals as pets in Nigeria, she came to Oxford in 1975 to read for a degree in zoology. She then went to Cambridge to do a PhD on cell differentiation during development.

She was one of the first to isolate embryonic stem cells in the mouse, and began her career as an independent scientist in 1988 at Columbia University in New York, manipulating embryonic cells and generating lines of mice that bore the corresponding phenotypes – a technique called gene targeting. She subsequently moved to Harvard, using this technique to study the patterning of the mouse body plan and identifying key transcription factors.

She returned to Oxford in 2004 as part of the newly-formed Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, and five years later accepted Herman Waldmann’s invitation to move her lab to the expanding Dunn School. Her work on the early embryos of mice continues to elucidate mutations in the genes for regulatory proteins that give rise to developmental abnormalities in humans.


Eric Sidebottom
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 18
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Eric Sidebottom has been associated with the Dunn School for more than 50 years, as medical student, lecturer, and recently, official historian. Sidebottom came to Oxford to read medicine at a time when two Nobel prizewinners, Howard Florey and Hans Krebs, were still lecturing to undergraduates. He completed his medical training at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London and came to the Dunn School as one of Henry Harris’s first DPhil students in 1966.

Sidebottom became interested in cancer, and used Harris’s cell fusion technique to explore the ability of cancer cells to spread throughout the body, or metastasise. Following the death of John French, Harris appointed him to organise all the teaching in the department, which led him to administrative roles including chairing the board of the Faculty of Medicine.

In the late 1980s Sidebottom moved to the Imperial Cancer Research Fund as Assistant Director of Clinical Research. Returning to the Dunn School after five years, he has since focused on the history of Oxford medicine, publishing Oxford Medicine: A Walk Through Nine Centuries, and Penicillin and the Legacy of Norman Heatley (with David Cranston).


Peter Stroud
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 19
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Pete Stroud is Mechanical Facilities Manager at the Dunn School, where he runs the maintenance and construction workshop. He has literally worked at the department ‘man and boy’, as his father ran the workshop before him, and as a teenager he used to help out in the holidays; since coming to work at the department he has lived on the site, in the flat formerly occupied by Howard Florey’s animal technician Jim Kent.

Having originally intended to become an automotive engineer at the Cowley Works, Stroud found that he enjoyed the variety of work in the Dunn School workshops, and joined his father there as soon as he finished school. He pursued a succession of technical qualifications on day release, while designing and building equipment for scientific analysis, such as electrophoresis tanks and radiation screens.

Stroud has seen demands on the workshop change as more equipment became available off the shelf, and computers became central to the control of many laboratory processes. But while maintenance has become a significant part of the work, innovative experiments still require some equipment to be designed and built on site.


Herman Waldmann
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 20
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Herman Waldmann FRS is Emeritus Professor of Pathology, and was head of the Dunn School from 1994-2013. He read medicine at Cambridge and qualified as a doctor in London before returning to Cambridge to do a PhD in the Department of Pathology.

In 1978 he joined César Milstein at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology to learn about monoclonal antibodies. Thereafter he pioneered the development of monoclonals as therapeutic agents, particularly Campath-1 (Alemtuzumab, now used to treat conditions including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and multiple sclerosis). In 1990 he set up a facility in Cambridge to make these agents (with Geoff Hale), but on his appointment as head of the Dunn School, he moved the Therapeutic Antibody Centre to Oxford.

His headship saw a massive development on the Dunn School site, with the building of a new animal house, the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, the EP Abraham Research Building and the Oxford Molecular Pathology Institute (OMPI). The number of research groups also grew rapidly, and Waldmann’s introduction of a central café has ensured that staff and students have a place to interact. Following his retirement he has continued to lead a research group working on mechanisms of immunological tolerance.


John Walker
Date: 2017
Shelfmark: MS. 12467 digital 21
Language(s) of Material: English
Extent: 1 item

Biographical/Historical

Sir John Walker FRS is Director Emeritus of the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, and a Nobel laureate. Despite Walker’s third-class degree in chemistry at Oxford, in 1965 Edward Abraham took him on as a PhD student at the Dunn School, where he worked on antibiotic structure and biosynthesis. There he met many of the key players in the penicillin story, including Abraham himself, Howard Florey, Margaret Jennings (Lady Florey) and Norman Heatley.

For the next five years he did post-doctoral research in molecular biology in the US and France, before a chance meeting with Fred Sanger brought him to the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. In 1994 he solved the structure of the catalytic region of ATP synthase, an enzyme vital to the biosynthesis of the energy-carrying molecule ATP, using X-ray crystallography, a discovery for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1997.

The following year he was appointed director of the Dunn Nutritional Laboratory (renamed the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit in 2009) in Cambridge, the original endowment of which also came from Sir William Dunn. He retired in 2013 but remains active in research.


Restrictions on Access:

Closed.



Transformation from XML (EAD 2.0) to HTML
19 April 2018